Category: Across the Street

Meet Savannah | 2017 Inspiring Little Citizens Finalist

Meet Savannah of Elk Grove, California. Just a few months shy of 10 years old, Savannah is a bright, young spirit with a big smile and an even bigger heart. She’s held bake sales, participated in charity runs and even donated some of her own savings, all to help support local foster child advocacy organizations.

Meet Lillian | 2017 Inspiring Little Citizens Finalist

Meet Lillian from Kansas City, Missouri. At just 7 years old, Lillian is an accomplished baker and lemonade-maker extraordinaire. But she’s not just making cookies and squeezing lemons to entertain friends and neighbors—this little citizen has bigger plans in mind. Lillian wants to make sure that all kids have enough to eat, so she’s selling her delicious treats to support No Kid Hungry.

Meet Lilyanne | 2017 Inspiring Little Citizens Finalist

Meet Lilyanne from Asheville, North Carolina. A young budding artist at just 4 years old, charismatic Lilyanne is as charitable as she is creative. When asked “what is something you would do to make someone who is unhappy at Christmas time feel better,” Lilyanne responded “I would paint them a pretty picture.” And that’s just what she did. In fact, she didn’t just paint one…she spent months painting 150 8″x10″ delightful works of art.

Meet Cash | 2017 Inspiring Little Citizens Finalist

Meet Cash from Marshall, Minnesota. He may only be 7 years old, but young Cash is quite the little entrepreneur. On a mission to help critically ill kids and their families get access to the medical services and support they need, Cash has been passionately raising money for the Ronald McDonald House since before he could walk through his service project, Cash’s Cans.

Making The Foreign Familiar Every Day :: Meet Amanda Freerksen

Here at Tea, we believe in making the foreign familiar, across the globe and across the street…Opening children’s eyes to the wonder of the world around them. Showing kids that, when you get down to the heart of things, we have a lot in common with other citizens of the world. And while a trip halfway around the world might instantly make the foreign familiar, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to go far to experience new sights, sounds and tastes!

Amanda Freerksen, of the blog Queso Suizo, (and one of our Tea Ambassadors!) shares with us a bit about her family, how they came to love Tea and how she strives to make the foreign familiar for her two kiddos at home.

Tea & Hundreds of Thousands of Women Around the World

I started my first business when I was about 9 or 10 years old. It was a retail business. Well, I’m not sure you would call it retail. Or even a business. But I sold stuff. Sometimes I would convince my neighborhood friends to raid their family pantries for ingredients that we could somehow turn into a baked good. Then we would go door-to-door. Who needs Thin Mints or a good cause! We had sugar, flour, and social networking. (Although I’m pretty sure I didn’t track my cost of goods sold very accurately — or at all.)

My first real business was also in retail. When I was 15, I started a delivery business for helium-filled balloons. Keep in mind that even in Tennessee you can’t drive when you are 15. So I guess that means that I co-founded my first legitimate business with my parents. They were the drivers, the landlords, and my board of directors. I had marketing collateral and financial statements — all hand-written on bright yellow paper and kept in a turquoise 3-ring binder that held my official business license tucked in the side pocket.

Tea works with 300 local boutiques around the country. These boutiques provide a service, human connection, and meaningful work for local communities.

Little Citizens of the World

A post from Tea Collection CEO and co-founder, Leigh Rawdon.

This is Rudi. Age 11. Loves reading. Loves music, especially listening to his parents and their friends singing and playing piano or violin or bass. He generally gets along with his brother, and he appreciates the home his parents have made for their family.

Rudi Friedrichs, Age 10. Berlin, 1937 or 1938

 

Rudi is proud of his dad, a doctor, who served in the first World War as a medic, taking care of fellow Germans. He enjoys the family’s traditions such as the humor from the annual search for matzah at Passover. He has a lot in common with most kids we know.

I’ve seen this picture and heard these stories, and I always put myself in Rudi’s shoes. But now, as a mother of a ten-year-old, I see myself in Rudi’s mom.