Cuisine: Italian

Fresh Homemade Pasta

homemade pasta recipe
Fresh Homemade Pasta
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Once you try a homemade pasta dish, it will be hard to go back to your usual boxed pasta. This recipe calls for eggs and flour but feel free to add in a dash of olive oil for taste or water if you find your dough to be too dry. Pair it with our Nonna's pasta sauce for your next family meal!
Fresh Homemade Pasta
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Print Recipe
Once you try a homemade pasta dish, it will be hard to go back to your usual boxed pasta. This recipe calls for eggs and flour but feel free to add in a dash of olive oil for taste or water if you find your dough to be too dry. Pair it with our Nonna's pasta sauce for your next family meal!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Skill Level
6servings 10minutes 5minutes
Servings Prep Time
6servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
5minutes 30 minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Mound the flour in the center of a large wooden board or counter top. Make a well in the center of the flour and add the eggs, olive oil and salt.
  2. Using a fork, beat the eggs together slowly beginning to incorporate the flour; starting with the inner rim of the well. As you expand the well, keep pushing the flour up to retain the well shape (do not worry if it looks messy).
  3. When half of the flour is incorporated, the dough will begin to come together. Start kneading the dough, using primarily the palms of your hands. Once the dough is a cohesive mass, set the dough aside and scrape up and discard any dried bits of dough.
  4. Continue kneading for 10 minutes, dusting the board with additional flour as necessary. The dough should be elastic and a little sticky to the touch. (If you press your finger into the center of the dough it regains its shape).
  5. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature before using.
  6. Sprinkle a baking sheet generously with flour (note: at this point aim to keep everything well-floured to prevent the pasta from sticking to itself or the roller as you work. If the dough starts to feel sticky as you roll it, sprinkle it with flour. Also sprinkle flour on any pasta you're not working (rolled, cut or otherwise) with and keep it covered with a dishtowel). Divide the dough into four equal portions. Dust the portions with flour and cover with a clean dishtowel.
  7. If you're using a pasta machine, set it to the thickest setting (usually marked "1"). Flatten one piece of dough into a thick disk between your hands and feed it through the pasta roller. Repeat once or twice. Fold this piece of dough into thirds, like folding a letter, and press it between your hands again. With the pasta machine still on the widest setting, feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers . Feed it through once or twice more until smooth. If desired, repeat this folding step. This helps to strengthen the gluten in the flour, giving it a chewier texture when cooked.
  8. Begin changing the settings on your roller to roll the pasta thinner and thinner. Roll the pasta two or three times at each setting, and don't skip settings (the pasta tends to snag and warp if you do). If the pasta gets too long to be manageable, lay it on a cutting board and slice it in half. Roll the pasta as thin as you like to go. For linguine and fettuccine, you can normally go to 6 or 7 setting.
  9. Cut the long stretch of dough into noodle-length sqaure sheets, usually about 12-inches. If cutting into noodles, switch from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter, and run the sheet of pasta through the cutter. Toss the noodles with a little flour to keep them from sticking and gather them into a loose basket. Set this basket on the floured baking sheet and cover with a towel while you finish rolling and cutting the rest of the dough.
  10. To cook the pasta immediately, bring a large pot of water to a boil, salt the water, and cook the pasta until al dente, 4-5 minutes. To dry, lay the pasta over a clothes drying rack, coat hangers, or the back of a chair, and let air dry until completely brittle. Store in an airtight container for several weeks. To freeze, either freeze flat in long noodles or in the basket-shape on a baking sheet until completely frozen. Gather into an airtight container and freeze for up to three months. Dried and frozen noodles may need an extra minute or two to cook.
  11. If you don't have a pasta machine and you want to cut it by hand -- don't worry, it can be done! Divide the dough into four pieces and mimic the action of a pasta roller with a rolling pin. Roll as thin as possible, lifting and moving the dough constantly to make sure it doesn't stick. Sprinkle the dough generously with flour and then gently roll it up. Use a very sharp chef knife to cut the roll cross-wise into equal-sized noodles. Shake out the coils, toss with flour, and proceed with cooking.
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Nonna’s Pasta Sauce

nonna's sauce
Nonna's Pasta Sauce
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Every family has at least one recipe that has been passed down and perfected through generations. It's the whole family's favorite meal...just the smell of it brings back memories, and the first bite always feels like home. For Stella (her mom Alexis is Tea's photo producer), that dish is her Nonna's Pasta Sauce. Stella, her mom (Alexis), dad (Rob) and brother (Marcel) traveled to Italy to learn more about their heritage and meet their extended family. While they were there, Nonna made her famous sauce with Stella. Now she shares the recipe with you, too!
Nonna's Pasta Sauce
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Every family has at least one recipe that has been passed down and perfected through generations. It's the whole family's favorite meal...just the smell of it brings back memories, and the first bite always feels like home. For Stella (her mom Alexis is Tea's photo producer), that dish is her Nonna's Pasta Sauce. Stella, her mom (Alexis), dad (Rob) and brother (Marcel) traveled to Italy to learn more about their heritage and meet their extended family. While they were there, Nonna made her famous sauce with Stella. Now she shares the recipe with you, too!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
2-3 dinners 15 minutes 1.5hours
Servings Prep Time
2-3 dinners 15 minutes
Cook Time
1.5hours
Instructions
  1. First, boil the tomatoes. Leave them in just-boiled water for a few minutes. Then take them out of the water. The skins should slip off easily. Dice the tomatoes-and the other vegetables too.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a 5 quart pan. Add the sliced garlic, celery, onion and carrot. Saute for about 4 minutes, stirring ever so often.
  3. Add your diced tomatoes and the tomato sauce. If your mom has some red wine handy, add a glass to the sauce. Add the oregano, basil, thyme and rosemary. Take a break and let the sauce simmer for 90 minutes. Then add in chopped parsley.
  4. If you're a meat eater, add the hamburger and sausages. Stir occasionally. Cook pasta in plenty of boiling water. Add salt just before the pasta. Cook it al dente (cooked but still firm).
  5. Stir the pasta with the sauce. Add freshly grated Parmesan cheese at the table. The last step? Tu mangi! (That's Italian for "You eat!"). Nonna says this sauce keeps in the fridge for a week!
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Grandma Lucy’s Meatballs

Recipe submitted by Danielle of CITYGIRLGONEMOM.COM

Growing up as an Italian girl in NYC, many recipes, stories and traditions were had in the kitchen.

I can still hear my grandma Lucy yelling for me, “Daniella, come in the kitchen and help grandma roll the meatballs!”

The smell of roasting garlic and her stories about past loves and being a child with 12 brothers and sisters always had me mesmerized. She grew up in a building where Lincoln Center stands today. She shared a room with 5 of her siblings. I was always amazed at that. When they got the notice they had to leave the building to build Lincoln Center, they migrated to Brooklyn. Lucy lived for a beautiful 90 years and we talk about her often. Cooking for her family was something she cherished and her recipes will continue to pass on generation after generation.

meatballs
Grandma Lucy's Meatballs
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Through the years we all have added a modern day spin to Grandma Lucy's meatballs. Don't forget to check the end of the recipe to see what our family adds to jazz it up. Another thing to note is many Italians don't measure ingredients, we just cook by the eye. Works great for our family, but if you need some measurements I have included them in this recipe.
Grandma Lucy's Meatballs
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Through the years we all have added a modern day spin to Grandma Lucy's meatballs. Don't forget to check the end of the recipe to see what our family adds to jazz it up. Another thing to note is many Italians don't measure ingredients, we just cook by the eye. Works great for our family, but if you need some measurements I have included them in this recipe.
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Soak your breadcrumbs in milk and let all the milk absorb. Mix all the ingredients together thoroughly. Form meatballs. I like to roll them small and grandma rolled them rather big. TIP: Keep a large bowl of ice water handy and dip your hands in the ice water when forming your meatballs. It helps stop your hands from becoming a sticky mess. Stage your meatballs on a platter until they are all rolled and ready to cook. IF you find your meatballs are too soft and they will not hold their shape, then consider adding more breadcrumbs. If they are too hard, consider adding another egg.
  2. Fry them in a skillet, that has an ample amount of canola oil or olive oil. Turning them as the “sides” brown. I have baked them on baking racks at 450, turning every 15 or so minutes.
  3. Drop them in your gigantic pot of sauce and let them continue to cook until you are ready to eat.
Our Modern Day Spin
  1. My rendition: I don't like to make my own bread crumbs, I enjoy using panko and a handful of basil in my meatball mixture. I also use ground turkey instead of the pork and ground beef. I have also used pureed carrots and have thrown that in.
  2. Uncle Frank: He, believe it or not, likes to add raisins. Don't ask why... He enjoys the sweetness.
  3. My dear friend Liz: She doesn't use chopped garlic, she uses a roasted garlic powder and likes the brand Penzys.
  4. My Cousin Angela: Grates zucchini for the health benefits and also only uses ground pork.
  5. My Cousin Damian: Beef & Veal and he says NO Basil.
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