Cuisine: Japanese

Mochi

Mochi
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A mochi maker - available at most Japanese stores and online, is crucial for this recipe! Once you invest in it, you'll be happy you did for all the mochi you can make!
Mochi
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A mochi maker - available at most Japanese stores and online, is crucial for this recipe! Once you invest in it, you'll be happy you did for all the mochi you can make!
Servings
30mochi patties
Servings
30mochi patties
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, rinse and carefully drain 8 cups of mochigome rice multiple times until the water runs clear.
  2. Cover with water and leave to soak for a minimum of 6 hours, to a day.
  3. Drain the water out of the soaking rice, shaking to remove any excess water and let it sit to completely drain for 15 minutes. It's better to use a wooden sieve or metal colander vs. a plastic one.
  4. Follow the instructions on your mochi maker and add two cups of water to the reserve area beneath the mochi maker bowl. Attach the bowl and stirring mechanism.
  5. Add the thoroughly drained rice to the mochi maker bowl and even out the top so it's flat. Make sure the cover attachment is locked.
  6. Set your machine on steam. It will automatically go to pound mode when it is ready and the grains of rice can be smashed with your finger.
  7. Watch as the mochigome turns into a glutinous mass when it's pounding. When finished, turn out the big ball of pounded rice onto a table that has been sprinkled with mochiko (rice flour) to avoid sticking.
  8. Very quickly, start forming the mochi into little patties by pinching off a small mound with your thumb and index finger.
  9. You can add anko (sweet red bean paste) in the center for a special treat.
  10. When you are ready to eat your mochi, preheat your toaster oven or oven to broil. Make a dipping sauce made up of 3/4 cup of sugar and 1/4 cup of soy sauce mixed together.
  11. On a tray lined with tin foil and sprayed with cooking spray, line up your mochi in rows so that you have at least in inch in between them. As they puff up, this prevents them from sticking to each other.
  12. Cook until the mochi puffs up and gets toasty brown on the top. Do not be surprised if the mochi patties double in size and start melding into each other. You can always pull them apart later. Enjoy!
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Persimmon Galette

Persimmon Galette
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Persimmon is a fruit native to Japan, China, Korea and Burma but is also grown in Northern California. A persimmon is reminiscent to an apple with a crisp texture, and it's color when ripe is a beautiful rich autumnal orange. This galette is perfect for the holidays!
Persimmon Galette
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Persimmon is a fruit native to Japan, China, Korea and Burma but is also grown in Northern California. A persimmon is reminiscent to an apple with a crisp texture, and it's color when ripe is a beautiful rich autumnal orange. This galette is perfect for the holidays!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8servings 20 minutes 40 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8servings 20 minutes
Cook Time
40 minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, blend flour and salt. Add in the butter and mix until it resembles a coarse meal.
  2. Add 2 tablespoons of ice water and blend until the dough begins to clump together, adding more ice water by the the teaspoonfuls if the dough is dry.
  3. While you're working the dough, continue to gather the dough into a ball. Once it is in a ball, flatten it into a disk. Wrap it in plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.
  4. After an hour, take the dough out and roll it between two sheets of parchment paper until it is approximately 1/8 inch thick. Place it back in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Combine the sliced persimmon slices, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and the lemon peel in a medium bowl. Toss to blend.
  6. Spread the preserves over the crust, leaving a 1 inch border.
  7. Arrange your persimmon slices overlapping each other. Feel free to make your own design! Fold the crust border up and over to create the galette shape.
  8. Brush the crust with milk or egg wash. Sprinkle the crust edges and persimmon with the remaining 1 tablespoon of sugar.
  9. Bake the galette for 20 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and continue baking until crust is golden, about 20 minutes longer.
  10. Let your galette stand for at least 10 minutes. Cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature with a scoop of ice cream!
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Udon Noodle Soup

Udon Noodle Soup
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Noodles are a main part of Japanese cuisine. Udon is a thick noodle that can be eaten in a soup or alone. This easy recipe can be added to with any topping you choose!
Udon Noodle Soup
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Noodles are a main part of Japanese cuisine. Udon is a thick noodle that can be eaten in a soup or alone. This easy recipe can be added to with any topping you choose!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
2people 30minutes 30minutes
Servings Prep Time
2people 30minutes
Cook Time
30minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. To make the soup, bring the dashi to a boil over medium high heat. Once boiling, add mirin, soy sauce and salt. Bring to a boil again and then turn off and set aside.
  2. Then, boil 3 cups of water and add the udon noodles. Make sure to separate them out while they cook. Once they are separated, remove them from heat and place in a bowl of ice water to prevent them from continuing to cook.
  3. Place your broth in a bowl and ladle the noodles in slowly. Top your soup with sliced cucumbers, bonito flakes, sesame seeds, seaweed and green onion or anything else you want to add!
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Ramen Noodles with Pork

Ramen Noodles with Pork
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Ramen Noodles with Pork
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Servings Prep Time Cook Time
2people 15minutes 20minutes
Servings Prep Time
2people 15minutes
Cook Time
20minutes
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a medium pot of salted water to boiling on high. Trim off and discard the root ends of the scallions; thinly slice the scallions, separating the white bottoms and green tops. Remove and discard the husks and silks of the corn. Cut the corn kernels off the cob; discard the cob. Cut off and discard the stem end of the eggplant; cut the eggplant into ½-inch-thick rounds. Peel and mince the ginger.
  2. Remove and discard any netting from the pork; pat dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper on all sides. In a large pan, heat 2 teaspoons of oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned pork. Cook, turning occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes per side, or until evenly browned. Transfer to a foil-lined sheet pan. Roast the seared pork 10 to 12 minutes, or until cooked through. (An instant-read thermometer should register 145°F.) Remove from the oven and transfer to a cutting board. Let rest for at least 5 minutes.
  3. While the pork roasts, wipe out the pan used to sear the pork. Add 2 teaspoons of oil; heat on medium-high until hot. Add the eggplant in a single layer; season with salt and pepper. Cook, flipping occasionally, 5 to 7 minutes, or until browned and tender. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate. Wipe out the pan.
  4. While the pork continues to roast, add 2 teaspoons of oil to the pan used to brown the eggplant. Heat on medium until hot. Add the ginger and white bottoms of the scallions; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened and fragrant. Add the corn, soy glaze, vinegar, demi-glace and 2 cups of water; season with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 6 minutes, or until thoroughly combined. Remove from heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  5. While the broth simmers, add the noodles to the pot of boiling water, stirring gently to separate. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until tender. Drain thoroughly and rinse under warm water. Divide between 2 bowls.
  6. Find the lines of muscle (or grain) of the rested pork; thinly slice crosswise against the grain. Stir any juices from the cutting board into the broth. Divide the finished broth between the 2 bowls of cooked noodles. Top with the browned eggplant and sliced pork. Garnish with the spice blend, green tops of the scallions and microgreens. Enjoy!
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Coconut Kabocha Soup

Recipe submitted by Jessica of Feed Me Dearly.

“Gone are the days when squash meant a choice of acorn or butternut. Yes, I still eat them, but there’s a special kind of thrill involved when you hack into your first Red Kuri, or break down a Kabocha, with its tough green skin and sweet, almost spiced orange flesh.

I’d recently bought some Japanese 7-spice because I’d seen someone using it in a curry, and it piqued my curiosity. I found my Japanese 7-spice at Spices and Tease in Chelsea Market, but Amazon and other online vendors will carry it as well.

While I’m familiar with Chinese 5-spice powder and use it frequently in my cooking, I’d never tried Japanese 7-spice – a spicy, earthy blend of orange peel, black, white and toasted sesame seeds, cayenne, ginger, Szechuan pepper and nori.

The spice mixture sounded like a perfect match for Kabocha. Sweet and spicy is one of my favorite flavor combinations, and with the orange and ginger, a virtual soup was quickly forming in the food-centric depths of my brain.

The Kabocha starts with a slow roast in the oven with a touch of olive oil, salt and pepper. Best to keep the flavors muted at this point to let the 7-spice really shine.”

Read her full post here!

Coconut Kabocha Soup
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"If there’s a dish that defines my cooking these days, it’s this soup. It’s simple to make, yet feels new and exotic. It’s healthy and can be eaten with a range of diets from dairy- & gluten-free to vegan/vegetarian, and even Paleo. It’s easy enough for a weeknight meal, but pretty enough to put on your Thanksgiving table."
Coconut Kabocha Soup
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"If there’s a dish that defines my cooking these days, it’s this soup. It’s simple to make, yet feels new and exotic. It’s healthy and can be eaten with a range of diets from dairy- & gluten-free to vegan/vegetarian, and even Paleo. It’s easy enough for a weeknight meal, but pretty enough to put on your Thanksgiving table."
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4people 15minutes 1 hour
Servings Prep Time
4people 15minutes
Cook Time
1 hour
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Break down your Kabocha squash by splitting it in half and scooping out the seeds. You can reserve the seeds for another use (spiced, roasted seeds can be made just as you would make roasted pumpkin seeds). Cut the squash halves lengthwise into segments (they’ll resemble half moons).
  3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and add the squash segments, tossing with the olive oil and seasoning with the salt and pepper to taste. Roast the squash for an hour, flipping halfway through. Let the squash cool, and then scoop out the flesh and reserve.
  4. Heat a Dutch oven on medium-high heat and add the olive oil, and the onions with a pinch of salt and pepper. Sweat the onions until translucent, stirring every so often to prevent browning.
  5. When the onions are nearly done, add the ginger and Japanese 7-spice, stirring frequently, for 1 minute. Add the Kabocha and stock, and bring to a boil, then turn your heat down to low. Simmer the soup for 10 minutes.
  6. While the soup is simmering, scoop the cream off the top of the coconut milk and reserve. Once the soup has been simmering for 10 minutes, add the rest of the coconut milk, and simmer for a few minutes more.
  7. Puree the soup with an immersion blender and taste again for seasoning. If you’d like to add more heat, add another pinch of the Japanese 7-spice. When ready to serve, ladle the soup into a serving bowl, and then top with a dollop of the coconut milk and another sprinkle of the Japanese 7-spice. Shower the soup with a pinch of Maldon salt which adds great texture and another salty contrast to balance the sweetness of the soup.
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