Ingredient: all-purpose flour

Persimmon Galette

Persimmon Galette
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Persimmon is a fruit native to Japan, China, Korea and Burma but is also grown in Northern California. A persimmon is reminiscent to an apple with a crisp texture, and it's color when ripe is a beautiful rich autumnal orange. This galette is perfect for the holidays!
Persimmon Galette
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Persimmon is a fruit native to Japan, China, Korea and Burma but is also grown in Northern California. A persimmon is reminiscent to an apple with a crisp texture, and it's color when ripe is a beautiful rich autumnal orange. This galette is perfect for the holidays!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8servings 20 minutes 40 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8servings 20 minutes
Cook Time
40 minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large mixing bowl, blend flour and salt. Add in the butter and mix until it resembles a coarse meal.
  2. Add 2 tablespoons of ice water and blend until the dough begins to clump together, adding more ice water by the the teaspoonfuls if the dough is dry.
  3. While you're working the dough, continue to gather the dough into a ball. Once it is in a ball, flatten it into a disk. Wrap it in plastic wrap and chill for 1 hour.
  4. After an hour, take the dough out and roll it between two sheets of parchment paper until it is approximately 1/8 inch thick. Place it back in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.
  5. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Combine the sliced persimmon slices, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and the lemon peel in a medium bowl. Toss to blend.
  6. Spread the preserves over the crust, leaving a 1 inch border.
  7. Arrange your persimmon slices overlapping each other. Feel free to make your own design! Fold the crust border up and over to create the galette shape.
  8. Brush the crust with milk or egg wash. Sprinkle the crust edges and persimmon with the remaining 1 tablespoon of sugar.
  9. Bake the galette for 20 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and continue baking until crust is golden, about 20 minutes longer.
  10. Let your galette stand for at least 10 minutes. Cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature with a scoop of ice cream!
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Cranberry-Orange Bread

Cranberry-Orange Bread
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My grandma is famous for her breads... zucchini, pumpkin, banana you name it. But my personal favorite is her cranberry-orange bread. It's best served with a light sugary icing but her recipe doesn't call for it. Serve with a nice cup of tea!
Cranberry-Orange Bread
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My grandma is famous for her breads... zucchini, pumpkin, banana you name it. But my personal favorite is her cranberry-orange bread. It's best served with a light sugary icing but her recipe doesn't call for it. Serve with a nice cup of tea!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8servings 35minutes 50minutes
Servings Prep Time
8servings 35minutes
Cook Time
50minutes
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 350°F and arrange a rack in the middle. Coat a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan with butter; set aside.
  2. Place the flour, sugar, orange zest, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in a large bowl and whisk to aerate and break up any lumps. Add the orange juice, melted butter, egg, and vanilla and stir with a spoon or rubber spatula until just combined. Stir in the cranberries and nuts, if using, until evenly distributed.
  3. Scrape the batter into the prepared loaf pan, pushing it into the corners and smoothing the top. Bake until a toothpick inserted into center comes out clean, about 50 minutes. Place the pan on a wire rack to cool for 15 minutes, then turn the bread out onto the rack and cool completely.
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Fresh Homemade Pasta

Fresh Homemade Pasta
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Once you try a homemade pasta dish, it will be hard to go back to your usual boxed pasta. This recipe calls for eggs and flour but feel free to add in a dash of olive oil for taste or water if you find your dough to be too dry. Pair it with our Nonna's pasta sauce for your next family meal!
Fresh Homemade Pasta
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Once you try a homemade pasta dish, it will be hard to go back to your usual boxed pasta. This recipe calls for eggs and flour but feel free to add in a dash of olive oil for taste or water if you find your dough to be too dry. Pair it with our Nonna's pasta sauce for your next family meal!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Skill Level
6servings 10minutes 5minutes
Servings Prep Time
6servings 10minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
5minutes 30 minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Mound the flour in the center of a large wooden board or counter top. Make a well in the center of the flour and add the eggs, olive oil and salt.
  2. Using a fork, beat the eggs together slowly beginning to incorporate the flour; starting with the inner rim of the well. As you expand the well, keep pushing the flour up to retain the well shape (do not worry if it looks messy).
  3. When half of the flour is incorporated, the dough will begin to come together. Start kneading the dough, using primarily the palms of your hands. Once the dough is a cohesive mass, set the dough aside and scrape up and discard any dried bits of dough.
  4. Continue kneading for 10 minutes, dusting the board with additional flour as necessary. The dough should be elastic and a little sticky to the touch. (If you press your finger into the center of the dough it regains its shape).
  5. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature before using.
  6. Sprinkle a baking sheet generously with flour (note: at this point aim to keep everything well-floured to prevent the pasta from sticking to itself or the roller as you work. If the dough starts to feel sticky as you roll it, sprinkle it with flour. Also sprinkle flour on any pasta you're not working (rolled, cut or otherwise) with and keep it covered with a dishtowel). Divide the dough into four equal portions. Dust the portions with flour and cover with a clean dishtowel.
  7. If you're using a pasta machine, set it to the thickest setting (usually marked "1"). Flatten one piece of dough into a thick disk between your hands and feed it through the pasta roller. Repeat once or twice. Fold this piece of dough into thirds, like folding a letter, and press it between your hands again. With the pasta machine still on the widest setting, feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers . Feed it through once or twice more until smooth. If desired, repeat this folding step. This helps to strengthen the gluten in the flour, giving it a chewier texture when cooked.
  8. Begin changing the settings on your roller to roll the pasta thinner and thinner. Roll the pasta two or three times at each setting, and don't skip settings (the pasta tends to snag and warp if you do). If the pasta gets too long to be manageable, lay it on a cutting board and slice it in half. Roll the pasta as thin as you like to go. For linguine and fettuccine, you can normally go to 6 or 7 setting.
  9. Cut the long stretch of dough into noodle-length sqaure sheets, usually about 12-inches. If cutting into noodles, switch from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter, and run the sheet of pasta through the cutter. Toss the noodles with a little flour to keep them from sticking and gather them into a loose basket. Set this basket on the floured baking sheet and cover with a towel while you finish rolling and cutting the rest of the dough.
  10. To cook the pasta immediately, bring a large pot of water to a boil, salt the water, and cook the pasta until al dente, 4-5 minutes. To dry, lay the pasta over a clothes drying rack, coat hangers, or the back of a chair, and let air dry until completely brittle. Store in an airtight container for several weeks. To freeze, either freeze flat in long noodles or in the basket-shape on a baking sheet until completely frozen. Gather into an airtight container and freeze for up to three months. Dried and frozen noodles may need an extra minute or two to cook.
  11. If you don't have a pasta machine and you want to cut it by hand -- don't worry, it can be done! Divide the dough into four pieces and mimic the action of a pasta roller with a rolling pin. Roll as thin as possible, lifting and moving the dough constantly to make sure it doesn't stick. Sprinkle the dough generously with flour and then gently roll it up. Use a very sharp chef knife to cut the roll cross-wise into equal-sized noodles. Shake out the coils, toss with flour, and proceed with cooking.
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Persimmon Cranberry Crisp

Persimmon Cranberry Crisp
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My first fall living in California, a friend gave me a bag of strangely shaped orange fruit, resembling a tomato. It was a persimmon, she explained, a fruit from Japan, but are now grown in California and other southwestern states. After the initial shock wore off that there was a fruit I didn't already know about, the next question was, what do you do with it? Turns out, lots. People use persimmons interchangeably with apples, so my first thought was, why not a persimmon crisp! Loaded with tart cranberries, this twist on apple crisp is refreshing and sweet.
Persimmon Cranberry Crisp
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My first fall living in California, a friend gave me a bag of strangely shaped orange fruit, resembling a tomato. It was a persimmon, she explained, a fruit from Japan, but are now grown in California and other southwestern states. After the initial shock wore off that there was a fruit I didn't already know about, the next question was, what do you do with it? Turns out, lots. People use persimmons interchangeably with apples, so my first thought was, why not a persimmon crisp! Loaded with tart cranberries, this twist on apple crisp is refreshing and sweet.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8people 15minutes 50-60minutes
Servings Prep Time
8people 15minutes
Cook Time
50-60minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 375º. Have ready a solid 10″ tart pan or single serving ramekins poised atop a rimmed baking sheet (to catch any wayward juices as the crisp bakes).
  2. In a large bowl, toss together the sliced persimmons, cranberries, sugar, lemon zest and juice, ginger and salt. Sprinkle the cornstarch over and fold until well-combined. Set aside.
  3. To make the topping, in a medium bowl, stir together the flour, oats, brown sugar, salt, ginger and cinnamon. Work the butter in with your fingertips or a pastry blender until the butter is blended in and the mixture begins to clump together.
  4. Scrape the fruit and juices into the tart or ramekins and spread evenly. Sprinkle the topping lightly over the top, squeezing it into almond-sized clumps. Don’t pack it down. Sprinkle a few pinches of flaky salt, and a teaspoon of coarse sugar, over the top of the crumble.
  5. Bake the crisp until the top is evenly golden and the fruit juices are bubbling thickly, 50-60 minutes. Let cool slightly, then serve warm, preferably with ice cream of some sort.
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