Tag: cross cultural connections

10 Ways to Make The Foreign Familiar at Home

MFF

Here at Tea, we believe in making the foreign familiar, across the globe and across the street… Opening children’s eyes to the wonder of the world around them. Showing kids that, when you get down to the heart of things, we have a lot in common with other citizens of the world. While a trip to India might instantly make the foreign familiar, it’s important to remember a trip half way around the world isn’t the only way to introduce new sights, sounds and tastes! Here are 10 ways you can make the foreign familiar at home, just in time for summer vacation!

#MakingTheForeignFamiliar in Jaipur

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#MakingTheForeignFamiliar

At Tea, we have a mantra: “We Go There.” And we mean it. Every six months, our designers literally go out into the world to discover the beauty that inspires each of our clothing collections. This year, for our India collection, we decided to embrace “going there” in a whole new way… with our children! For the first time ever, Emily and her family followed in the designers footsteps and traveled across the globe with her husband Hilton and two children, Clement, 6, and Georgia, 4 (and grandma too!). Throughout the month of May, Tea will be sharing Emily’s journey with you. We will have many stories, new products, and lots of beautiful imagery (her experience was captured by Hideaki Hamada) and lots more! Here are just a few highlights from the trip… 

An Indian Omelette Recipe

indian breakfast

Indian meals are an elaborate feast for the eyes and the mouth. Flavors and spices play a large role in every meal, even if it is a simple Indian omelette at breakfast! When our team was in India, they had this delicious omelette one morning and raved about this twist on a traditional American omelette. The beautiful fruit spread (custard apple, apples, pears and banana) was pretty great too! Try recreating it at home with your family… make the foreign familiar!

The Pink City: City Palace

Pink City #2The “Pink City” is the name given the magical city of Jaipur, India. Anyone who has been lucky enough to travel to Jaipur can attest, the city truly glows shades of pink. But, why pink? In 1876, the Prince of Wales and Queen Victoria were to be visiting India on a tour. In India, pink denotes the color of hospitality so, the Maharaja Ram Singh of Jaipur painted the whole city pink to welcome his guests. The pink still stands and Jaipur residents, by law, are asked to maintain the pink color of their residences.

Savory Donuts from South India

Vada_Elise-HannaA few weeks ago, we connected with American film photographer, Elise Hanna, who lives in Chennai, India with her family. We were immediately entranced by her beautiful photography and mouth watering recipes. Reading her blog makes you feel as if you are right there with her experiencing the smells and tastes of the food she writes about and photographs. Here she shares with us the story on vada, South India’s answer to a savory donut. 

Animations, Illustrations & Indian Deities

HinduSaying the words, Ghee Happy, makes us happy. We assume the same goes for anyone who stumbles upon Sanjay Patel, illustrator extraordinaire and the owner of the Ghee Happy brand. Patel has produced four books under Ghee Happy, and his day job? He also happens to be an animator and story board artist for Pixar Animation Studios! When we were in India, we came across Patel’s illustrations and immediately bought his incredible book, The Little Book of Hindu Deities on Amazon. We were drawn to the colorful animations and sweet (informative) stories behind the Hindu myths. The book is amusing to children and adults alike; our copy director brought the book home to her 4-year-old and it has quickly become a favorite. Read on to learn about all of the animals, gods and goddesses, monsters, demons, noble warriors and divine divas, and don’t forget about Ganesha the elephant!

Get Design Tips From Emily

After many years of traveling the world, Tea co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, Emily Meyer, has acquired an eye for worldly design. Her Palo Alto home, which she shares with her husband, Hilton and two children, Clement (6) and Georgia (4) is living proof! In their April issue, Family Circle featured Emily and her family in their eclectic space – Don’t miss her design tips!

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With each trip Emily takes, whether it’s scouting inspiration for the next Tea season or visiting family abroad, she makes sure to find bazaars to search for treasures to bring back home. “I love pulling a design scheme together with exotic objects and textiles.” says Emily. Their home, built in 1908, has been transformed with a bold palatte, peppered with well-traveled finds – a Turkish Ikat pillow, a Mailan coverlet.