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Grandma Lucy’s Meatballs

Recipe submitted by Danielle of CITYGIRLGONEMOM.COM

Growing up as an Italian girl in NYC, many recipes, stories and traditions were had in the kitchen.

I can still hear my grandma Lucy yelling for me, “Daniella, come in the kitchen and help grandma roll the meatballs!”

The smell of roasting garlic and her stories about past loves and being a child with 12 brothers and sisters always had me mesmerized. She grew up in a building where Lincoln Center stands today. She shared a room with 5 of her siblings. I was always amazed at that. When they got the notice they had to leave the building to build Lincoln Center, they migrated to Brooklyn. Lucy lived for a beautiful 90 years and we talk about her often. Cooking for her family was something she cherished and her recipes will continue to pass on generation after generation.

meatballs
Grandma Lucy's Meatballs
Votes: 2
Rating: 3.5
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Through the years we all have added a modern day spin to Grandma Lucy's meatballs. Don't forget to check the end of the recipe to see what our family adds to jazz it up. Another thing to note is many Italians don't measure ingredients, we just cook by the eye. Works great for our family, but if you need some measurements I have included them in this recipe.
meatballs
Grandma Lucy's Meatballs
Votes: 2
Rating: 3.5
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Through the years we all have added a modern day spin to Grandma Lucy's meatballs. Don't forget to check the end of the recipe to see what our family adds to jazz it up. Another thing to note is many Italians don't measure ingredients, we just cook by the eye. Works great for our family, but if you need some measurements I have included them in this recipe.
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Soak your breadcrumbs in milk and let all the milk absorb. Mix all the ingredients together thoroughly. Form meatballs. I like to roll them small and grandma rolled them rather big. TIP: Keep a large bowl of ice water handy and dip your hands in the ice water when forming your meatballs. It helps stop your hands from becoming a sticky mess. Stage your meatballs on a platter until they are all rolled and ready to cook. IF you find your meatballs are too soft and they will not hold their shape, then consider adding more breadcrumbs. If they are too hard, consider adding another egg.
  2. Fry them in a skillet, that has an ample amount of canola oil or olive oil. Turning them as the “sides” brown. I have baked them on baking racks at 450, turning every 15 or so minutes.
  3. Drop them in your gigantic pot of sauce and let them continue to cook until you are ready to eat.
Our Modern Day Spin
  1. My rendition: I don't like to make my own bread crumbs, I enjoy using panko and a handful of basil in my meatball mixture. I also use ground turkey instead of the pork and ground beef. I have also used pureed carrots and have thrown that in.
  2. Uncle Frank: He, believe it or not, likes to add raisins. Don't ask why... He enjoys the sweetness.
  3. My dear friend Liz: She doesn't use chopped garlic, she uses a roasted garlic powder and likes the brand Penzys.
  4. My Cousin Angela: Grates zucchini for the health benefits and also only uses ground pork.
  5. My Cousin Damian: Beef & Veal and he says NO Basil.
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Rolled Empanadas

phyllo dough empanadas
Rolled Empanadas
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
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We first had these phyllo dough empanadas during our stay at the Candelaria Del Monte estancia in Argentina. The light and crispy shell was a nice change from the doughy empanadas we had in Bolivia. Give these a try – they’re simple & satisfying and the kids can be involved in the process!
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
phyllo dough empanadas
Rolled Empanadas
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
We first had these phyllo dough empanadas during our stay at the Candelaria Del Monte estancia in Argentina. The light and crispy shell was a nice change from the doughy empanadas we had in Bolivia. Give these a try – they’re simple & satisfying and the kids can be involved in the process!
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
16 25 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in a non-stick pan over medium high heat. Stir occasionally, until ground beef is fully cooked and browned. Set aside to cool.
  3. When meat is cool, combine with additional filling ingredients.
  4. Lay 16 phyllo pastry sheets carefully in a large tray. Cover with a damp towel (paper towel works too) to prevent breaking.
  5. Take one spoonful of the filling mixture and place it on the short end of the phyllo strip. Roll away from you a few times, then fold the sides of the strip in and continue to roll the dough until there is no dough left to roll.
  6. Brush with a little olive oil and egg wash and place onto a large (and lightly oiled) baking sheet.
  7. Repeat this process with all phyllo rolls and place in the oven at 400 degrees for 15 minutes.
  8. Serve warm with your favorite yogurt dip. Enjoy!
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Indian Corn Pudding

Indian Corn Pudding
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
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Not many people have ever heard of Indian Corn Pudding before, but if you're from New England or more specifically Rhode Island, there's a good chance you've stumbled upon it at grandma's house. This dessert dates back to the very first Thanksgiving with the mix of Puritan and Native American cultures. The Puritan's from England brought their love of puddings and mixed with the Native American's ground-corn puddings, Indian Corn Pudding was born. This savory treat is perfect with a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream and is best enjoyed warmed.
Servings Prep Time
8 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2 hours
Indian Corn Pudding
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Not many people have ever heard of Indian Corn Pudding before, but if you're from New England or more specifically Rhode Island, there's a good chance you've stumbled upon it at grandma's house. This dessert dates back to the very first Thanksgiving with the mix of Puritan and Native American cultures. The Puritan's from England brought their love of puddings and mixed with the Native American's ground-corn puddings, Indian Corn Pudding was born. This savory treat is perfect with a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream and is best enjoyed warmed.
Servings Prep Time
8 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2 hours
Servings Prep Time
8 people 15 minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2 hours
Ingredients
Servings: people
Units:
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and butter a 2-quart baking dish. In a large pot, warm milk over medium-high heat until hot but not boiling. Whisk in cornmeal, stirring constantly, until it bubbles. Then reduce the heat to medium-low.
  2. Stir in molasses, and whisk, cooking for 2 more minutes. Crack eggs into a medium bowl and lightly beat. Very slowly add 1/2 cup of hot cornmeal mixture to the eggs, whisking constantly. Pour tempered egg mixture into the pot, whisking constantly to keep the eggs from scrambling. Cook for 3 more minutes, then remove from the heat.
  3. Stir in vanilla, raisins, sugar and ginger. Pour mixture into prepared pan, then place in a larger baking dish or roasting pan. Transfer to the oven and carefully pour hot water into the larger dish until it comes halfway up the sides of the smaller baking dish.
  4. Bake until pudding has set, but still jiggles slightly in the center, for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Serve warm, topped with whipped cream or ice cream.
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Peach Cobbler

peach cobbler
Peach Cobbler
Votes: 2
Rating: 4
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"A cup, a cup, a cup, a stick" is how I've always remembered my mom's cobbler recipe. This isn't the kind of cobbler you might be thinking of... the kind that resembles a pie. This cobbler is ooey, gooey and more like a cake. It's not gluten-free, vegan or healthy whatsoever. But I can promise you one thing... It's delicious. Growing up in Texas, it was a staple dessert in the summer months, but after moving around the country I've learned that it can be made with any in-season fruit no matter the time of year. Best served with a giant scoop of vanilla ice cream on top!
Servings Prep Time
1 cobbler 10 minutes
Cook Time
45-60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cobbler 10 minutes
Cook Time
45-60 minutes
peach cobbler
Peach Cobbler
Votes: 2
Rating: 4
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
"A cup, a cup, a cup, a stick" is how I've always remembered my mom's cobbler recipe. This isn't the kind of cobbler you might be thinking of... the kind that resembles a pie. This cobbler is ooey, gooey and more like a cake. It's not gluten-free, vegan or healthy whatsoever. But I can promise you one thing... It's delicious. Growing up in Texas, it was a staple dessert in the summer months, but after moving around the country I've learned that it can be made with any in-season fruit no matter the time of year. Best served with a giant scoop of vanilla ice cream on top!
Servings Prep Time
1 cobbler 10 minutes
Cook Time
45-60 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 cobbler 10 minutes
Cook Time
45-60 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: cobbler
Units:
Instructions
  1. Depending how sweet your fruit is, add a little sugar and set aside while you fix the dough.
  2. Mix the sugar, flour, baking powder, salt, and milk in a bowl and stir well.
  3. Melt the stick of butter in a pie dish. I find that one not too deep works best. Pour in the "dough" and put the fruit on top. It will be a cake consistency.
  4. Bake at 350 until it doesn't jiggle in the middle. 45 minutes to an hour or longer. Dough should rise up over the fruit, but don't feel bad if it doesn't. It will still taste good!
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Masala Omelette

masala omelette
Masala Omelette
Votes: 4
Rating: 4.25
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Indian meals are an elaborate feast for the eyes and the mouth. Flavors and spices play a large role in every meal, even if it is a simple omelette at breakfast! When our team was in India, they had this delicious omelette one morning and raved about this twist on a traditional American omelette.
Servings Prep Time
1 10 minutes
Cook Time
2 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 10 minutes
Cook Time
2 minutes
masala omelette
Masala Omelette
Votes: 4
Rating: 4.25
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Indian meals are an elaborate feast for the eyes and the mouth. Flavors and spices play a large role in every meal, even if it is a simple omelette at breakfast! When our team was in India, they had this delicious omelette one morning and raved about this twist on a traditional American omelette.
Servings Prep Time
1 10 minutes
Cook Time
2 minutes
Servings Prep Time
1 10 minutes
Cook Time
2 minutes
Ingredients
Servings:
Units:
Instructions
  1. Beat the eggs in a bowl until frothy. Excluding the oil, add the rest of the ingredients. Heat oil (or butter) in a frying pan.
  2. Once it is hot, reduce heat and add egg mixture – swirl it around the pan. Cook on a low to medium flame until the sides are cooked and the underside is slightly brown. The center may appear uncooked and liquidy, not to worry! Slowly flip over and cook the other side for 30 seconds.
  3. Fold the omelette in half and flip onto a plate! Serve with fruit or bread. Note: You can add any vegetables you have in the fridge!
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