Ingredient: butter

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

stuffed cabbage rolls

stuffed cabbage rolls
Stuffed Cabbage Rolls
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Some call it a Polish dish, many have has a Hungarian version... You might have tried them in Germany or Greece. While there are many variations, today I'm sharing my family's take on the dish.
Stuffed Cabbage Rolls
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Some call it a Polish dish, many have has a Hungarian version... You might have tried them in Germany or Greece. While there are many variations, today I'm sharing my family's take on the dish.
Servings Cook Time
6 2hours
Servings
6
Cook Time
2hours
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Melt roughly 2 tbsp of the butter. Add onion to sauté until semi-clear. Add garlic and sauté for about 30 seconds more. Add ground beef, 1 tsp of pepper, salt and mustard. Cook until the meat has browned. Add cooked rice and carrots mix. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Remove the core of the cabbage and place in boiling water. Boil for about 5 minutes. Peel softened leaves and set aside. If inner leaves are still tough, return to the boiling water until soften. Repeat until all leaves are removed.
  3. Melt remaining butter in sauce pan and add tomato sauce and remaining 1 tsp pepper. Allow sauce to simmer while you assemble cabbage rolls.
  4. Spoon filling onto the end of a leaf and roll, tucking in sides as you go. Repeat until all leaves are used. Please rolls into a greased casserole dish and spoon sauce over rolls.
  5. Place in oven for 30 minutes at 325 degrees.
  6. We love to serve the rolls with mashed potatoes. It's a hearty meal! To lighten it up, feel free to serve with salad or as a stand alone dish!
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Swedish Tea Ring

During the holidays in Sweden, many people celebrate Saint Lucia Day as well as Christmas. Saint Lucia day falls on December 13th and honors the Saint Lucia, who is known to bring love, kindness and light to the Swedish people during the dark times of winter. On the morning of December 13th, a family’s eldest daughter dresses in a long white nightgown and places a wreath lined with ligonberries and nine candles on her head. She wakes the household carrying coffee and baked treats, such as saffron buns, tea cakes and gingerbread cookies. Saint Lucia’s presence on this morning symbolizes the return of light and a joyous start to the holiday season. Here, Tea’s Design Director, Hannah Robinson, shares her family’s Swedish Tea Ring recipe.

Swedish Tea Ring
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"When I think about my family’s holiday traditions, one of the first things that comes to mind is the beautiful Swedish tea ring that my mom makes every Christmas morning. By the time I get out of bed, my mom has already formed the kneaded dough into a ring and has placed it in the oven to bake. Quite frankly, nothing is better than waking up to the smell of sweet dough baking when it’s chilly outside! After the tea ring cools, my mom adds a festive touch by lightly drizzling icing across the top of it and placing a crimson-colored candle in the center. We then gather as a family to start our day of celebration by opening stockings and each enjoying at least one slice of my mom's delicious breakfast treat."
Swedish Tea Ring
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"When I think about my family’s holiday traditions, one of the first things that comes to mind is the beautiful Swedish tea ring that my mom makes every Christmas morning. By the time I get out of bed, my mom has already formed the kneaded dough into a ring and has placed it in the oven to bake. Quite frankly, nothing is better than waking up to the smell of sweet dough baking when it’s chilly outside! After the tea ring cools, my mom adds a festive touch by lightly drizzling icing across the top of it and placing a crimson-colored candle in the center. We then gather as a family to start our day of celebration by opening stockings and each enjoying at least one slice of my mom's delicious breakfast treat."
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8people 20 minutes 30minutes
Servings Prep Time
8people 20 minutes
Cook Time
30minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. To make the dough, start by scalding the milk and stirring in the butter, sugar and salt. Cool to a lukewarm temperature. Dissolve the yeast in warm water. Add milk mixture, eggs and half of the flour to the yeast and beat until smooth. Stir in as much of the remaining flour as necessary to make the dough slightly stiff.
  2. Turn dough on floured board and let rest 5 minutes. Knead the dough 5-8 minutes until it’s smooth and elastic. Put in greased bowl and grease the top. Cover and let it rise in a warm place until double in size (which will take about 1 hour).
  3. To make the tea ring, start by working the butter into the sugar. Add in a lemon peel and almonds and mix well. Roll dough into a 14" x 10" rectangle and sprinkle sugar mixture evenly over the dough.
  4. Arrange dried fruit evenly over all and roll up from the long side. Form it into a circle on a greased baking sheet and seal ends together firmly. Snip the dough with scissors from the edge of the circle—3/4 of the way to the center every 1 1/2".
  5. Turn the cut pieces on their sides. Place a greased tin can in the center to keep the hole round for a non-drip candle. Cover and let it rise until it’s double in bulk (which will take about 1 hour).
  6. Now, to make the icing, mix all the icing ingredients together. Preheat your oven to 350-degrees. Bake it for 25-30 minutes. Let it cool and lightly drizzle icing on top of it. To finish it up, place a candle in the center and enjoy the start to your holiday!
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Baguette French Toast

Baguette French Toast
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The day after Thanksgiving may be the toughest time to cook for people who have hosted the big feast the day before. In my family, my stepmom calls it her day of rest. Her baguette french toast is the absolute perfect solution to keeping us all well fed with minimal effort on her part. She uses leftover (if there is any!) baguettes from dinner and throws any fruit she has in it, our favorite are blueberries! The best part about this breakfast, or brunch, is that you can make it the day before and pop it in the oven when you're ready to eat.
Baguette French Toast
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The day after Thanksgiving may be the toughest time to cook for people who have hosted the big feast the day before. In my family, my stepmom calls it her day of rest. Her baguette french toast is the absolute perfect solution to keeping us all well fed with minimal effort on her part. She uses leftover (if there is any!) baguettes from dinner and throws any fruit she has in it, our favorite are blueberries! The best part about this breakfast, or brunch, is that you can make it the day before and pop it in the oven when you're ready to eat.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
6servings 10minutes 30 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6servings 10minutes
Cook Time
30 minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Grease a 13 x 9 inch baking dish and set aside.
  2. Arrange the slices of bread in a single layer in the dish.
  3. In a large bowl, beat the eggs. Add in the milk, nutmeg, vanilla, and 3/4 cup of the brown sugar. Stir well to mix.
  4. Pour egg mixture evenly over the bread. Cover and let sit for 8 hours in the refrigerator, or overnight.
  5. The next morning, or when you are ready to bake, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter and remaining 1/4 cup of brown sugar, stirring well.
  6. Top the egg mixture with the pecans and blueberries, then drizzle on the butter sauce.
  7. Bake for 30 - 45 minutes, or until set and golden brown on the top. Serve warm with maple syrup.
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Buttermilk Pie

buttermilk pie
Buttermilk Pie
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Rating: 3.6
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Holidays aren't complete until everyone at the family gathering has had a piece of buttermilk pie! It's sweet and decadent and sure to be a hit. This is my great grandmother's recipe and it couldn't be any easier to throw together. Enjoy this sweet southern dessert and let us know how it goes over at your next holiday party!
Buttermilk Pie
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Holidays aren't complete until everyone at the family gathering has had a piece of buttermilk pie! It's sweet and decadent and sure to be a hit. This is my great grandmother's recipe and it couldn't be any easier to throw together. Enjoy this sweet southern dessert and let us know how it goes over at your next holiday party!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
1pie 5minutes 1hour
Servings Prep Time
1pie 5minutes
Cook Time
1hour
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Melt butter.
  3. Add all other ingredients and stir well.
  4. Pour into unbaked pie shell and bake for 1 hour. Let sit for at least 30 minutes before serving.
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Indian Corn Pudding

Indian Corn Pudding
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Not many people have ever heard of Indian Corn Pudding before, but if you're from New England or more specifically Rhode Island, there's a good chance you've stumbled upon it at grandma's house. This dessert dates back to the very first Thanksgiving with the mix of Puritan and Native American cultures. The Puritan's from England brought their love of puddings and mixed with the Native American's ground-corn puddings, Indian Corn Pudding was born. This savory treat is perfect with a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream and is best enjoyed warmed.
Indian Corn Pudding
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Not many people have ever heard of Indian Corn Pudding before, but if you're from New England or more specifically Rhode Island, there's a good chance you've stumbled upon it at grandma's house. This dessert dates back to the very first Thanksgiving with the mix of Puritan and Native American cultures. The Puritan's from England brought their love of puddings and mixed with the Native American's ground-corn puddings, Indian Corn Pudding was born. This savory treat is perfect with a dollop of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream and is best enjoyed warmed.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
8people 15minutes 1 1/2hours
Servings Prep Time
8people 15minutes
Cook Time
1 1/2hours
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and butter a 2-quart baking dish. In a large pot, warm milk over medium-high heat until hot but not boiling. Whisk in cornmeal, stirring constantly, until it bubbles. Then reduce the heat to medium-low.
  2. Stir in molasses, and whisk, cooking for 2 more minutes. Crack eggs into a medium bowl and lightly beat. Very slowly add 1/2 cup of hot cornmeal mixture to the eggs, whisking constantly. Pour tempered egg mixture into the pot, whisking constantly to keep the eggs from scrambling. Cook for 3 more minutes, then remove from the heat.
  3. Stir in vanilla, raisins, sugar and ginger. Pour mixture into prepared pan, then place in a larger baking dish or roasting pan. Transfer to the oven and carefully pour hot water into the larger dish until it comes halfway up the sides of the smaller baking dish.
  4. Bake until pudding has set, but still jiggles slightly in the center, for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Serve warm, topped with whipped cream or ice cream.
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Peach Cobbler

peach cobbler
Peach Cobbler
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"A cup, a cup, a cup, a stick" is how I've always remembered my mom's cobbler recipe. This isn't the kind of cobbler you might be thinking of... the kind that resembles a pie. This cobbler is ooey, gooey and more like a cake. It's not gluten-free, vegan or healthy whatsoever. But I can promise you one thing... It's delicious. Growing up in Texas, it was a staple dessert in the summer months, but after moving around the country I've learned that it can be made with any in-season fruit no matter the time of year. Best served with a giant scoop of vanilla ice cream on top!
Peach Cobbler
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"A cup, a cup, a cup, a stick" is how I've always remembered my mom's cobbler recipe. This isn't the kind of cobbler you might be thinking of... the kind that resembles a pie. This cobbler is ooey, gooey and more like a cake. It's not gluten-free, vegan or healthy whatsoever. But I can promise you one thing... It's delicious. Growing up in Texas, it was a staple dessert in the summer months, but after moving around the country I've learned that it can be made with any in-season fruit no matter the time of year. Best served with a giant scoop of vanilla ice cream on top!
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
1cobbler 10minutes 45-60minutes
Servings Prep Time
1cobbler 10minutes
Cook Time
45-60minutes
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Depending how sweet your fruit is, add a little sugar and set aside while you fix the dough.
  2. Mix the sugar, flour, baking powder, salt, and milk in a bowl and stir well.
  3. Melt the stick of butter in a pie dish. I find that one not too deep works best. Pour in the "dough" and put the fruit on top. It will be a cake consistency.
  4. Bake at 350 until it doesn't jiggle in the middle. 45 minutes to an hour or longer. Dough should rise up over the fruit, but don't feel bad if it doesn't. It will still taste good!
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