Tag: travel with kids

take a trek from home

Is your little citizen dreaming of a trip abroad? Do you wish you could take them to China’s Great Wall or Costa Rica’s rainforest but have to savor a “staycation” instead this year? If so, we’ve found another way to get traveling: an amazing site that will take you and your little citizen trekking across the globe.

Global Trek sponsored by Scholastic is your little citizen’s passport to the world. Older kids can wander the site on their own and younger ones can mosey around the globe with your help. The site features a background, guided tour, and information about the people of each country. It even has a space for your citizen to journal about what they learn as they trek. This is a great site for making the foreign a little more familiar for your little citizens, especially the older ones!

one reason we travel: the kindness of strangers

With few exceptions, in our travel experiences locals are kind and helpful to us travelers. Having a child along seems to only augment locals’ desire to help disoriented foreigners as well as their desire to provide you with helpful child-rearing information.

Take a recent foray into an Argentine supermercado as an example. I was looking for plain, unsweetened, yogurt for my daughter Grace. It seemed like a very basic staple, especially in the large Western-style grocery store where I was shopping. To my dismay I faced a refrigerator case full of countless packaged yogurts, all of which boasted interesting fruity (and highly sugared) flavors. No supermarket staff was in sight so I turned to the other lone shopper in that aisle, a smartly dressed woman in her mid-40s, and in my most helpless tone struck up the following conversation. Bear in mind the entire conversation took place in two levels of Spanish – poorly (me) and fluently rapid-fire (smartly dressed woman). I have taken the liberty of translating my Spanish as if it were perfect and her Spanish as I understood it, not necessarily as she actually said it.

Me: Excuse me, I am looking for plain yogurt for my baby. Do you know where I can find that?

Woman: Oh of course, let’s see it must be here somewhere. (Proceeds to wander up and down refrigerated case peering carefully at each variety. She finally pulls one down and hands it to me). This one is good for babies.

Me: (After reading container) Oh I see, but this one contains sugar. Do you know if I can find one without sugar or without flavoring? Plain yogurt?

Woman: Oh but your baby needs sugar. She will like this flavor. (some kind of mixed fruit) Babies love this flavor.

Me: (Placing tutti-frutti, high-fructose corn syrup-laden yogurt in cart) Thank you, I will try it. But do you know if there is also any yogurt that is plain?

Woman: (Not at all flustered by my persistence) Yes, I think so. (Wanders again up and down the entire refrigerated case, finally pulling down a small carton which she hands to me). This one is plain. But I don’t think your baby will like it. Babies like sweet yogurt.

Me: (Trying to be as diplomatic as possible in bad Spanish) Thank you. We’ll try both of them.

The kind but insistent woman and I parted ways and I left the grocery store with a carton each of tutti-frutti yogurt and plain yogurt. To my delight Grace preferred the plain yogurt. It’s nice to be right but it’s even nicer to have a warm encounter with a kind stranger in a new place.

travel sites that make traveling with little citizens easier

The team at Tea has found the stories here about travel so inspiring. From photos of little citizens in Paris to memories of children’s laughter in Turkey, parents are showing us all that travel is a real possibility with kids of all ages and a perfect way to make the foreign more familiar.

Making these trips happen, though, is another story. The world’s huge, the incredible options of places to go vast, and the online information about traveling with kids, well, quite overwhelming. While you may dream of swimming in the oceans of Bali maybe you’re wondering if your kids will fit into a trip there. When you were a kid you loved visiting the Sistine Chapel, but is this still a good place for a family adventure?

If you’re dreaming of globe hopping with your little citizens and are as inspired by the stories here as we are, why not check out these sites to begin planning your next kid friendly trip? We hope they make planning travel a little easier for you and your growing world explorers:

Baby Friendly Boltholes
Ciao Bambino
Family Travel Forum
Travel for Kids

fall 2008’s inspiration: norway

flying into NorwayIn May 2007, Emily and I headed north to explore the vast country of Norway in search of inspiration for Tea’s Fall 2008 collection.

This was my first visit to a Scandinavian country and I was expecting clean and modern aesthetic. Upon landing in this rich country, I was instantly taken by the enveloping evergreens and the woodwork, immaculate even in the airport.

I knew that this was a country that respected its natural resources and proudly celebrated them through craft. I could not wait to see what we would find…


We began our trip in Oslo, visiting museums and taking in Norwegian metropolitan culture.

One notable stop was the Norsk Folkemuseum, which featured 150 reconstructed townhouses, farm buildings, and churches from Norway’s past.

Here, we discovered a style of folk painting called Rosemaling (see below). This style of painting emerged in Norway around the late 18th century. Artists from the more rural areas in Norway would travel from home to home, painting interior walls and furniture. The homeowners would provide warm shelter and food for these artists in return for their services.

The color and detail of these scroll-like floral designs were captivating in beauty and impressive in coverage.

Later, we found that this painting style influenced embroidery in Norwegian folk costume. This discovery inspired us to come up with our own modern interpretation.

(Norwegian Folk Embroidery and Tea’s Inspired Print)

(Below from left to right: Tea’s Rasmussen Floral Dress and Elina Embroidery French Terry pants)

We also found that hand and loom weaving have been a native tradition in Norway, often done by families in times of celebration. There are many different types of traditional weaving, but 2 examples stood out, Billedvev (pictured here), a pictorial tapestry…

…and Rutevev, a geometric style (below).

These flat woven textiles were typically done in village homes found amongst the fjords. We were fascinated by the textures and colors in these textiles, so we headed north in search of some to make our own.

By chance and through a little help from friends that we met along the way, we ended up at the Stalheim Hotel.

A beautiful hotel set atop a 300 meter high cliff, not only does this hotel boast amazing views, it also has a spectacular collection of Norwegian crafts and a reconstructed folk village.

The varied patterns and color we found in Stalheim’s collection of textiles inspired us to interpret them in rich sweaters and bright plaids.

(above: Norwegian woven textiles)

(Above from left to right: Tea’s Stalheim Fairisle sweater, Aurland plaid shirt, and Ingrid Jacquard sweater)

(Emily and me at the lookout from the Stalheim Hotel)

It is hard to be in fjord country without going on a fjord tour. We were in luck as we were close to one of Norway’s most famous, the Sognefjord. It is of the longest and deepest in Norway, an inlet jutting over 100 miles into the country and over 4000 feet deep.

You can’t deny the beauty and massive landscape surrounding you in Norway. We tried to capture this feeling through voluminous silhouettes in this Fall’s collection like the Aurland Plaid Dress and Fjord Coat (both pictured here).




welcome to the tea blog

Welcome to the Tea Blog, a conversation about raising a growing generation of global citizens. We hope you stay and explore all the wonderful stories Tea parents are sharing about their little citizens and the world they’re growing in.

At Tea, we’ve been talking about these little citizens of the world since the company started six years ago. Season after season we bring a little bit of the world into our collections, sending our design team around the globe to find inspiration that makes the foreign a little more familiar.

This summer, the Tea team is excited that so many people are joining us in this conversation about raising little global citizens.

Need help navigating your way through our writer’s inspiring stories? Our blog is divided into several categories:

CURIOSITY includes articles about how parents are introducing a global perspective into their children’s lives. Wander on into CURIOSITY to learn about Katherine Bose studying Mandarin with her toddler.

HERITAGE explores where we come from and how our family roots can reach far and wide. Check out Africa Fine’s stories of raising a bi-cultural family and Kathleen Cantrell’s post on keeping her Italian heritage alive in her kitchen.

INSIDE TEA is a place where you can get to know our Tea family a little better. Here people in our company contribute their perspective on life at Tea. Tea offers an international travel allowance that has sent our team far and wide. Read all about Leah’s trip to Greece, especially idyllic because it was her honeymoon!

In RECOMMENDATIONS, I will post your recommendations for things you’ve found help you raise your little citizens of the world. So far, we have a book recommendation from Stephanie Precourt and a bassinet Cindy McLaughlin thinks is great for travel. We hope to make this a go-to place for anyone looking for tips for globally-minded parents!

STYLE is all about children’s clothing. At Tea, we believe that because children’s clothing is a part of everyday life it has the power to reflect both our values the beauty found across the world. In STYLE we will post stories of our globally minded clothes and how they’re shaping the stories of little citizens everywhere.

TRAVEL is all about travel. We at Tea have found these stories so inspiring! Beware: they may move you to take out a notebook and start planning your next international adventure right away! The postings here include everything from travel tips to reflections on globe hopping with little citizens. We hope TRAVEL will become a rich resource for parents looking to share the globe with their kids.

We are so excited to have you join our conversation! Feel free to comment on articles that move you, contact us with ideas on how we can grow, and raise your hand if you’d like to become a writer. We’d love to have you share your stories with the Tea community!

We can’t wait to see this conversation flower, unfolding into a space where parents can share their ideas and experiences and ultimately enrich the lives of the little citizens everywhere.

The Editor

exploring new zealand

We took our son Luke to New Zealand for seven weeks of exploring when he was 13 months old. I don’t know how much of the Kiwi culture he absorbed during that time, but he did display an innate ability to take long naps in a backpack during six hour hikes, to snooze through a helicopter ride with glacier landing, and to make it just fine sleeping through the night in any manner of pack-n-play, port-a-cot, or whatever sort of crib the bed and breakfast of the day could provide – so long as he was nuzzled in with his favorite blanket. And his parents learned that babies require a lot less gear than they previously had thought, that they are remarkably adaptable to drastic time changes and the obliteration of the daily routine, and that journeying to new parts of the globe with the newest member of the family only enhances the sense of adventure and camaraderie that motivates us to travel in the first place. Oh, and that those pull-down swinging bassinettes are an absolute God-send on overnight flights… as are portable DVD players… and the ability to breastfeed a toddler on a mountaintop or in a pub with minimal embarrassment. And the trip was enough of a success that, three months later, we took him to the Italian Alps for more of the same.

a globehopping little citizen

I realized then and there that our then-23-month-old, Milo is a true Little Citizen of the World. We were in a (perfectly engineered for strollers) taxi in London, heading for Heathrow, about to take the final leg of our 5-week journey back home to San Francisco.

“Milo”, I said, “do you know where we’re going now?”
“AIRPORT!” he cried (we had discussed this at length previously).
“That’s right honey, but do you know where our plane will be going?”
“Madrid!”
“No sweetie-pie, we’ve been there already. Where do you think we’re going now?”
“Berlin?!!”
“Nope, not this time! We’re going home to see Penelope (our beagle).”
“New York!”
“Uh..no. We live in San Francisco. Remember?”
“Airplane go Denver?”
“No Milo. We’re going home to San Francisco. Remember your bed there with the monkey mobile?”
“Mino’s hotel big bed?”
“Not exactly – we’re going to our house in San Francisco with your own big-kid bed. Remember that?”
Milo wide-eyed, “No.”