Category: Through the Eyes of…

Hear from Our Team: Celebrating International Women’s Day

For International Women’s Day, we’re taking a moment to celebrate the amazing women (and men) of Tea! Hear what our employees have to say about balance, teaching their kids to be little citizens of the world, and celebrating themselves.

Tea's Leadership Team

International Women’s Day is a day to recognize the incredible women in our lives. As a female-founded company with a majority female leadership team, Tea is rooted in the accomplishments of women who are passionate about what they do. This year’s theme is #BalanceforBetter, asking us to reflect on what we’re doing to create a more balanced world. We sat down with some of our team to hear what they had to say about this year’s theme and more.

One of the first questions working parents — particularly working moms — get asked is how they balance having a career with children. Some of the team compared it to walking across a tightrope; others thought of a seesaw.

Our founder and CEO Leigh Rawdon spoke to the inherent bias that comes with the question, and challenged the notion of adhering to external standards:

Leigh Rawdon

Leigh Rawdon, Tea’s Founder & CEO

What does that actually mean to say, “Do you balance it all?” What’s most important to me is that I don’t use any external standard of what being a good enough mother is or what being good at my job is. I’m not playing a role on TV. I am who I am, and I do what I do. With my kids, I want to raise good, engaged citizens of the world. I want them to discover their purpose and feeling of fulfillment… I am here to shepherd them into this world, but I’m not here just to do that. I have my own sense of purpose, so it’s less about how do I balance one versus the other and it’s more about how do I have a full mix of richness in my own life.

We wear multiple hats, but are not defined by any single one. As we grow up, Leigh advised not to compare ourselves to others:

Measure yourself against your own standards and not against someone else’s external expectations of what success looks like.

 

Dreaming Big

 

Reflecting on what she would tell her younger self, our Senior Copywriter Symmi said to just go for it:

Symmi

 

No dream is too big or too small. In fact, the bigger the better. If you can think it, then there’s more than likely a way to do it. I would tell my younger self, and younger girls everywhere, to think about it and go for it. Don’t be afraid. There’s a quote that I like: “If you dream something and it scares you, then you’re going in the right direction.” – Symmi, Senior Copywriter

 

 

 

Amy, our VP of Finance, would assure herself that she has what it takes to go through the highs and lows that come with life:

Amy

 

 

Have confidence in the fact that life is going through some challenges and having successes, and it all comes together and that feeds into the person who you are. – Amy, VP of Finance

 

 

 

Raising the Next Generation

 

Tomorrow’s generation are today’s kids. Here’s how our team is teaching their children to be good global citizens:

Cindy

 

I think it’s super important to expose them early on to different cultures and what’s outside of their day-to-day. Both my kids were born in Taiwan. We travel every year to a new destination. I’m a big believer in going to different places, learning about something new, and exposing them to what’s different. – Cindy, VP of Marketing & E-Commerce

 

Vicente

 

 

I think one of the first things that separates us is language. My parents taught me Spanish, so I speak exclusively, or try to speak exclusively Spanish to my little guy. – Vicente, Creative Operations Director

 

David

 

The way I teach my son to be a little citizen of the world is how I conduct myself. He’s always watching me. He’s always around me. So whatever I do, he’s going to pick up. The way I would teach him to become a respectable young man is to try to be the best person that I can be. – David, Web Developer

 

 

Ansley

 

I think one thing I’m always focusing on is trying to encourage my daughter to be curious. There’s no silly question out there, and I want her to be comfortable to ask me anything she has a question about. – Ansley, Sr. Director of Operations

 

 

 

Celebrating and Taking Care of Yourself

 

We ended on a lighter note, asking our team how they celebrate themselves:

Spend time with my girlfriends laughing, cocktailing and enjoying each other’s company. No one builds you up like your gal pals. – Tina, VP of Product

The way I celebrate myself is making sure I have time for my own hobbies… It’s important for me to foster other parts of creativity, whether it’s through hobbies like tap dancing or making time for my friends. – Kim, Senior Graphic Designer

For me, holding space for experiences that engage and strengthen my support system is the ultimate act of self-care. – Sarah, Head of Community

What are you doing to #BalanceforBetter this year? Let us know in the comments below.

International Women’s Day: Celebrating Our Leading Ladies

Leigh Rawdon and Emily Meyer

As a clothing company founded by women, we are surrounded by superwomen every day. And every day we at Tea work hard to create meaningful clothes that tell a story, spark curiosity, and empower our little citizens of the world to not only think big, but think beyond themselves… and be their very best selves.

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, let us take a moment to celebrate all of the amazing women out there… the fearless leaders who paved the way for women’s rights and made it possible for young girls and women to stand tall and proud today; the courageous matriarchs who instilled that sense of confidence, purpose and belonging; and the future change-makers who will continue to break down barriers and set forth new ideas.

CEO, champion of dinner time, trusted adviser, hug healer—a woman’s super powers come in so many forms… so we’ve asked a handful of our little citizens to tell us what a superwoman means to them. Here’s what they had to say…

Global Mom: Meet Elaine from Denver, Colorado!

Each month, we’ll be sharing a guest post by Andrea Fellman of Wanderlust Living,  Andrea’s set out to interview global moms + dads who are very “Tea” – they look for adventure in their lives and strive to make the foreign familiar for their families through travel and curiosity! A long time Tea partner and a woman who truly embodies the Tea spirit, we’re thrilled to have Andrea as a foreign correspondent (she lives in Barcelona!). In Andrea’s fourth guest post, we’re introducing you to Elaine, who lives with her family in Denver, Colorado. Read on to learn more!

Foreign Correspondent: A Family’s Trip Through Norway

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Meet Jessica Turpin, mom and writer of the blog Aisle Seats Please. While being stationed overseas in Germany, the family of 5 does quite a bit of traveling throughout Europe. As a Tea Foreign Correspondent, Jessica shares her story of her family’s adventure to Norway for a week long tour through the beautiful countryside and majestic fjords! Follow along as she shares her story with us at Studio Tea.

Meet Amy Kimoto-Kahn & Get Her Family Recipe for Mochi!

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We love meeting new people and learning about their families. At the launch of our Studio Tea space, we had the pleasure of meeting Amy Kimoto-Kahn, mom, wife, cook, traveler and author of the cook book Simply Ramen + the blog easypeasyjapanesey. Amy is a lovely woman who has a successful and interesting life raising three little ones and sharing Japanese-American recipes via her blog and cookbook, among other things! It’s no secret that we’re huge fans of ramen (any noodle really) so we were thrilled to flip through her cook book. Read on to see our recent interview with Amy and get her recipe for mochi! 

Asia: Through the Eyes of Matthew and Adam

Through the Eyes of Oscar and Betty Blair

In our new series, Through the Eyes of, you’ll hear directly from children; Children who have a story to tell. They’ve lived abroad and visited a new city for the first time. They’ve traveled hours by plane to meet their grandparents for the first time and traveled ten minutes by car to visit their local museum for the fifth. They live in Italy, Denmark and Michigan. They’re the little citizens of the world experiencing the everyday magic that surrounds them and they’re sharing their stories with us here.

You may know their mother, Gabrielle Blair. She is a designer, Design Mom blogger and ALT Summit co-founder. After 8 years in New York and almost a year in Denver, they moved their family to France to experience another culture and learn a new language. After 2 1/2 years abroad, we knew Oscar and Betty would the perfect pair to help us kick off this series!

Through the Eyes of Oscar and Betty Blair

My name is Betty Blair, and I am 7, almost 8. I have 5 siblings, and my favorite color is turquoise. A board game that I really like is Clue; I like to read a lot, right now, I’m reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Right now I’m on page 133.

My little sister is 3 years old. My brother is 9, my big sister is 12, my biggest sister is 14, my oldest sibling (brother) is 16. I like reading together with my family, and playing games, and jam sessions where we all sing songs and play music together—I only sing, I really love to sing. We also film videos, the series is called Olive Us. It’s basically about the kids in our family having fun adventures.

Betty Blair

Tell us what life was like living in France.

A regular day, we went to school, it was a French school. On the drive, we would always pass by a church that was built in like 1400 something, and we would all shout: “Eglise Saint Germain d’Argentan!” That was the name of the church. At school, we worked on reading and writing and math and other subjects. Sometimes we would walk to a nearby pool and swim there. That’s where I learned to swim. Sometimes, we would walk to a ping-pong center and learn how to play ping-pong. When school was over, my Dad would pick us up. While we were waiting, we would play on the playground. I started in pre-school, it was called Maternelle, then I went to Kindergarten, it was called Grande Section, and I went to 1st grade, it was called CP. In Kindergarten, we learned to write our name in cursive, in CP, we really learned to write in cursive. The school lunch was SO good! I liked it better than school lunch here.

I really liked it in France. Sometimes I still wish we lived there because I had a lot of friends, and everybody was really nice. I also really liked our house in France, we had a big open back yard, and the house was really fun because it was like 300-400 years old. We also lived out in the country, by a lot of small farms, so we could buy eggs from our neighbor, and milk from our other neighbor. The bread was really good, and I also really loved cucumbers, and I loved the butter and milk. We also got fresh creme—called creme cru, kind of like sour cream, but yummier, and I really liked it.

Also we lived close to Paris, it was only 2 hours away, there was a really yummy ice cream shop that we would always go to when we went to Paris. It was also really exciting to see the Eiffel Tower, and the Arc de Triomphe whenever we went to Paris.

What was it like moving to a new country? I was sort of scared when we first moved—I didn’t know what I was doing, I didn’t really know how to speak French. Then we arrived, and I learned French, and now I’m fluent. It took maybe 5 months for me to feel comfortable in French, and after maybe a year and a half, I was fluent—so I could do all the school assignments, and I could ask the teacher if I had any questions. I was the only English-speaking girl in my class.

Where did you hang out with your friends? A few times, I had a playdate where a friend came to our house, or I went to their house. Sometimes there was a festival in the town where I would see my friends.

What is your favorite memory from living there? Some of my favorite memories were going to the bakery and getting mini tarts. I also really liked picking wild blackberries down the street from our home—there were lots of berries, and all the neighbors would pick the berries at different times and put them in their pails. I liked eating the berries while I was picking them, and also eating them with cream after. Yum! I also liked picking wild flowers by our home in the Spring. Every spring, the hillsides by our home would be like bursting with yellow spring flowers, and we would pick them and make bouquets. I also liked going on trips with my family to different parts of France or Europe.

Oscar Blair

I’m Oscar Blair, and I’m 9 years of age. I like adventure, like climbing trees, nerf gun fights, and I like Mine Craft. My family has 8 members, my Mom and Dad and there are 6 kids. I’m number 4. I like to hike and go swimming with my family.

Tell us what life was like living in France.

For breakfast I would usually have Nutella toast, or jam toast. We had Nutella all the time, and I really miss it. I know we can get it here, but we just don’t. I would go to school, the school lunch was really good. My favorite thing was the fries—they were just good for some reason. Another thing that was good was the cake. Who doesn’t like cake? School was all in French. It was really hard at first, but I got used to it.

There weren’t that many toys to play with during recess, just jump ropes and balls. School felt shorter there, even though it was actually longer. We never had school on Wednesdays, and we had a two week vacation every 6 weeks.

What was it like moving to a new country? It was hard to understand French for a while. It wasn’t scary because we thought we knew French even though we actually didn’t. People were really nice and helped me a lot, even when I didn’t speak French. Early on, my teacher would speak English to me to help, but she would speak with a big French accent. Eventually, I learned to speak French fluently.

Where did you hang out with your friends? I was too young to hang out, but we would play a lot in the recess area. We would play a lot of different tag games.

What is your favorite memory from living there? One of my favorite memories was getting baptized in a freezing cold river by our home. I loved going to the local swimming pool too. It had the best slide ever, and a very shallow place for the kids, and we couldn’t wear regular swimming shorts, we had to wear like speedos. I liked stacking the wood for our fire place and helping to start the fire.

I loved the pastries! I loved creme puffs (they were called tropeziennes, but we called them creme puffs). I also loved picking strawberries and raspberries from our backyard. Apples were really popular in our area, and I loved going to see apple farms and drinking apple juice. And I loved the crepes!

I also loved traveling to other places in France and Europe, a favorite memory is jumping off a high dive into a lake near Berne, Switzerland.